Teaching a Rondo (Jim Solomon’s Alpha IV from The Body Rondo Book)

This rondo may be viewed on Amazon.com here: http://tinyurl.com/3xhepb6

Click on the book, search inside, and you can view the rondo.

 

                                    Part I

  1. Have students to walk for 16 beats. Label that walk as a letter A on the board. Talk about taking a walk on a country road.
  2. Tell students to imagine they see farmers working in a field. Allow them to choose how to move to illustrate farming movements. They make work with one or two people. Label this action as letter B.
  3. Have them take a walk again and let them know that they are doing the letter A movement again.
  4. Ask what they might see on their walk next. A student might suggest they see people playing on a beach. Have them act this out for 16 counts again and label this movement as C.
  5. Have them repeat the A section again and let them know that the pattern they have demonstrated is called a Rondo.

Part II

  1. Teach these words a section at a time. The words fit the Alpha IV rhythms.

A. Little chili peppers, Little Chili peppers, Little Chili peppers hot-cha cha cha

B. Cool my tongue with water from a water hose, Cool my tongue with water from a hose.

A. Little chili peppers, Little Chili peppers, Little Chili peppers hot-cha cha cha

C. I feel much better, I feel much better, I feel much  better. I want more!

A. Little chili peppers, Little Chili peppers, Little Chili peppers hot-cha cha cha

  1. Say the words and pat legs. Add the claps and foot stomps back in.
  2. Perform the whole rondo while saying the words.
  3. Drop out the words and perform the rondo as a body percussion piece.

 

Part II

  1. Transfer the A section to hand drums and/or congas or djembes.
  2. Play the B part on another percussion instrument.
  3. Repeat A part
  4. Play C part on another percussion instrument
  5. Repeat the A section once more.

 

Optional: Have a student improvise the notes while playing the B section rhythm on an alto xylophone in C pentatonic.                 Play the C part the same way.